Scottish Gaelic language

learn scottish gaelic language

To this day, we can still see the ancient Gaelic names that locals crafted for the landscape around them all. Gaelic is all across Scotland– even in areas that have a different culture these days. It’s on the tips of some of our tongues as well; still alive in words like bourach, glen, ceilidh, and shindig

A riddle:

What covered the land
from North to South,
and East to West,
like a soft blanket of mist
on the land and towns alike?

The Scottish Gaelic language! To this day, we can still see the ancient Gaelic names that locals crafted for the landscape around them all. Gaelic is all across Scotland– even in areas that have a different culture these days. It’s on the tips of some of our tongues as well; still alive in words like bourachglenceilidh, andshindig.

Throughout the various twists and turns of history, Gaelic language and culture stayed strong in the highlands and islands of Scotland. As modernization and brutal politics changed the country, many Gaels left – and not always willingly. North America offered many opportunities and it wasn’t long before Gaels were appearing in our beloved New England. The Gaelic language traveled with these emigrants, settling in the New England woods and towns.

By learning and using Gaelic, we’re not only connecting to our region’s early history – we’re keeping richness in the world.

Thank you for learning and supporting the Gaelic language.

Gaelic with Jason

Additional Resources

Author and Curator

  • Jason studied with native speakers in Nova Scotia and Scotland while completing 2 degrees: a BA with First Class Honors in Celtic Studies and a Bachelors of Education in Gaelic, Art, and History. He has been teaching Gaelic professionally since 2012. Jason taught for 5 years on the Isle of Islay in Scotland and has been teaching for the University of Dundee in Scotland since 2018. “In high school, I discovered a deep appreciation for the culture of Ireland and Scotland. Traditional music filled my music collection and I taught myself how to play the harp. Stories of the Fairy Folk and great heroes like Cù Chulainn and the Fianna burned in my imagination. I had to learn more. “I followed these stories to Nova Scotia, Canada, where I started a BA in Celtic Studies. During my first year, I fell in love with Scottish Gaelic.”

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